89 Connect Forums Media & Journalism Hate speech in Politics

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    • #2481
      Robert CrestRobert Crest
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      832 Points
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      I think that everyone agree with me that Europe is experiencing an increase in hate speech, meaning all forms of expression spreading and based on any kind of intolerance against religious, ethnic and linguistic minorities, migrants and descendants, gender related issues.

      The most annoying fact is, in my point of view, that politicians should play a crucial role in fighting hate speech and intolerance, having an ethical responsibility in doing so. However, politics is often the starting point to spread, incite, promote or justify racial/gender/religious hatred.
      And the information technology, of course, has been really effective in spreading and amplifying hate speech.

      It seems to me a widespread problem in all of Europe, more or less. Or better, all around the world. It is still a problem of freedom of expression, or can we talk about ethics and the changing status of politics in our lives?

      • This topic was modified 2 years, 10 months ago by Robert Crest.
    • #2521
      Elisa PerezElisa Perez
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      309 Points
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      I agree with your worries Robert. I think that behaviour and manners have less value nowadays, and politicians more and more speak like common people to attract votes and grab the attention of the media by adopting a loud, aggressive tone.
      As you said, politicians should be role models, and what’s happening is that people say: “If politicians are saying it, why shouldn’t we?”. They feel justified, and the hate speeches spread.

      Furthermore, I think that this is a problem more widespread than you said. We have this problem in Europe, of course… but we need to include in our debate at least Trump, globally speaking.

    • #3119
      Robert CrestRobert Crest
      Participant
      832 Points
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      Thank you for your reply, Elisa.

      Indeed, Trump is a great example of what I am talking about. One evidence above all is the use he make of his Twitter account, to the extent that Twitter had to consider the possibility of blocking it. Final decision was to keep it, as Twitter argues something like the fact that hate speech can be in the public interest.
      However, all the most famous Social Media usually have strict policies against the forms of hate speech and misusing of their channels, look at Facebook’s bans as an example.

      Based on the European Convention on Human Rights and the European Court of Human Rights, we may have to be careful in distinguishing between harsh criticism and hate speech. Moreover, it appears preferable to combat hate speech through discussion and political debate rather than through sanctions.

      Do you agree with that or do you feel like the opposite?

       

      • This reply was modified 2 years, 7 months ago by Robert Crest.
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